login   |    register
Armor/AFV
For all military ground-force modelling subjects.
MACV-SOG Podcasts
Klaus-Adler
Staff MemberCampaigns Administrator
MODELGEEK
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Scotland, United Kingdom
Joined: June 08, 2015
KitMaker: 1,497 posts
6th Scale: 0 posts
Posted: Friday, September 18, 2020 - 04:01 AM UTC
Hi All,

so i found these purely by accident on youtube looking for something else, they're a bunch of podcasts about MACV-SOG guys during the Vietnam war. Now i have to warn you that there is some Adult Language in them from time to time and the podcasts last about 3 hours. There can be a fair amount of waffle at the start and particularly at the end of the podcast ( usually the last half an hour is Jocko promoting stuff but his podcasts are NOT full of adverts and well worth listening to as these stories are told mostly by the men who actually took part in those missions.

I have linked some of my favourites below and they usually last 3 hours so if you have a long drive home then make the most of them, why these have never been turned into a major hollywood film is beyond me.

Podcast 180

Podcast 181

Podcast 182

Podcast 186

This one below is one of my favourites
Podcast 205


This one is taken from the first 60 pages of the book What the heck! and it's an amazing story.
Podcast 247
18Bravo
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Colorado, United States
Joined: January 20, 2005
KitMaker: 7,212 posts
6th Scale: 0 posts
Posted: Friday, September 18, 2020 - 04:07 AM UTC
Jocko's podcasts have made many a long night on exercise far more bearable. The one on Chesty Puller's son caused me to go out and purchase "Fortunate Son."
Klaus-Adler
Staff MemberCampaigns Administrator
MODELGEEK
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Scotland, United Kingdom
Joined: June 08, 2015
KitMaker: 1,497 posts
6th Scale: 0 posts
Posted: Friday, September 18, 2020 - 05:12 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Jocko's podcasts have made many a long night on exercise far more bearable. The one on Chesty Puller's son caused me to go out and purchase "Fortunate Son."



yeah, bought all 3 books by John Stryker Meyer and Lynne block's book whiskey tango foxtrot.
trickymissfit
Joined: October 03, 2007
KitMaker: 1,375 posts
6th Scale: 0 posts
Posted: Friday, September 18, 2020 - 07:35 PM UTC
best thing I ever saw on SOG was a book titled SOG by John Plaster. I have not met John, but have met several of the men he interviewed for the book. One in mind was very candid and spoke as a matter of fact. Or make your hair turn white. That guy was part of Team Illinois. Most of his trips over the fence were in Laos, but he did two insertions in Cambodia (so he said). Told him once that SOG teams rolled thru my base camp about once every ten days, but never came back our way. He knew who they were and where they did their recon.
About once a year they'd all get together for a really good drunk at my VFW. Actually a pretty nice bunch of guys once you met them (about twenty men). The one thing that got my attention about them was their challange coin! Mine is about two inches in diameter, and Steve's had to be three and a half inches!
gary
Klaus-Adler
Staff MemberCampaigns Administrator
MODELGEEK
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Scotland, United Kingdom
Joined: June 08, 2015
KitMaker: 1,497 posts
6th Scale: 0 posts
Posted: Friday, September 18, 2020 - 09:50 PM UTC

Quoted Text

best thing I ever saw on SOG was a book titled SOG by John Plaster. I have not met John, but have met several of the men he interviewed for the book. One in mind was very candid and spoke as a matter of fact. Or make your hair turn white. That guy was part of Team Illinois. Most of his trips over the fence were in Laos, but he did two insertions in Cambodia (so he said). Told him once that SOG teams rolled thru my base camp about once every ten days, but never came back our way. He knew who they were and where they did their recon.
About once a year they'd all get together for a really good drunk at my VFW. Actually a pretty nice bunch of guys once you met them (about twenty men). The one thing that got my attention about them was their challange coin! Mine is about two inches in diameter, and Steve's had to be three and a half inches!
gary



yeah that one is on my hit list as well but i have 4 books about MACV-SOG on the "to read" pile.
trickymissfit
Joined: October 03, 2007
KitMaker: 1,375 posts
6th Scale: 0 posts
Posted: Saturday, September 19, 2020 - 10:11 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

best thing I ever saw on SOG was a book titled SOG by John Plaster. I have not met John, but have met several of the men he interviewed for the book. One in mind was very candid and spoke as a matter of fact. Or make your hair turn white. That guy was part of Team Illinois. Most of his trips over the fence were in Laos, but he did two insertions in Cambodia (so he said). Told him once that SOG teams rolled thru my base camp about once every ten days, but never came back our way. He knew who they were and where they did their recon.
About once a year they'd all get together for a really good drunk at my VFW. Actually a pretty nice bunch of guys once you met them (about twenty men). The one thing that got my attention about them was their challange coin! Mine is about two inches in diameter, and Steve's had to be three and a half inches!
gary



yeah that one is on my hit list as well but i have 4 books about MACV-SOG on the "to read" pile.



make sure you read about the radio relay station on a mountain top in Laos. Will make the hair stand up on the back of your neck.

Our base camp was part of an experiment dreamed up by C Team folks in DaNang. The closest arty umbrella was ten miles north, and don't think the NVA hadn't figured this one out. Being where we were dumped, we controlled an eight mile radius. The SF guys always had two teams out 24/7, and we shot 80% of the time for them. Where we were gave us control of 2/3rds of the Hiep Duc Ridge line, and we made it a point to shoot that place up daily.
The Hiep Duc tee'd into the Que Son Valley, and that was a place where young men grew up. I did OP's in there regularly, and you can put that place where the sun don't shine! Due south (just out of arty range by about two klicks) was Marry Anne. SF had teams in there constantly, and it was a horrible place. Marry Anne sat deep in a valley, so it would have been near impossible to hit the perimeter with 155's due to the angle of trajectory. M102's would have worked, but the higher up's left them home. Just near impossible to shoot high angle fire with the old 155's, and in Vietnam everything went by the arty umbrella. Yet no arty could reach A102 with the exception of the 175 guns on Ross (also a big no no)

Most folks don't know how MAC-V was built. There were units that stayed inside the country and of course SOG. Anybody in SF could cross the fence, and on occassion others did as well. I did a 29 day OP about fifty feet from the LAO border with a MAC-V Heavy Team in June of 68. That place just gave you the creeps looking at it, and the neighbors had no sense of humor. We lost the mountian top due to the lack of warm bodies. Those guys had a couple teams across the fence daily. You could write a book on their month long saga! Then there were the C-Team guys! This group is seriously interesting. That's where the term Mobile Strike Force comes from, and trust me they're evil! Marines used to have a bumper sticker touting about "if it has to be destroyed in 24 hours." Nobody was as nasty of a Mobile Strike Force. Think scorched earth policy! I heard Vinnie Poole say once that he could put together an 800 man strike force in two hours! I saw him do three hundred a couple times. By the way we lost Vinnie in late August or early September 68. I think it was the way he would have wanted it. By the way Vinnie's hero was Bennie Adkins. About as tough a man as have ever walked on this planet. He had a phrase he often used "What would Bennie do?"
gary
Klaus-Adler
Staff MemberCampaigns Administrator
MODELGEEK
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Scotland, United Kingdom
Joined: June 08, 2015
KitMaker: 1,497 posts
6th Scale: 0 posts
Posted: Saturday, September 19, 2020 - 10:21 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text


Quoted Text

best thing I ever saw on SOG was a book titled SOG by John Plaster. I have not met John, but have met several of the men he interviewed for the book. One in mind was very candid and spoke as a matter of fact. Or make your hair turn white. That guy was part of Team Illinois. Most of his trips over the fence were in Laos, but he did two insertions in Cambodia (so he said). Told him once that SOG teams rolled thru my base camp about once every ten days, but never came back our way. He knew who they were and where they did their recon.
About once a year they'd all get together for a really good drunk at my VFW. Actually a pretty nice bunch of guys once you met them (about twenty men). The one thing that got my attention about them was their challange coin! Mine is about two inches in diameter, and Steve's had to be three and a half inches!
gary



yeah that one is on my hit list as well but i have 4 books about MACV-SOG on the "to read" pile.



make sure you read about the radio relay station on a mountain top in Laos. Will make the hair stand up on the back of your neck.

Our base camp was part of an experiment dreamed up by C Team folks in DaNang. The closest arty umbrella was ten miles north, and don't think the NVA hadn't figured this one out. Being where we were dumped, we controlled an eight mile radius. The SF guys always had two teams out 24/7, and we shot 80% of the time for them. Where we were gave us control of 2/3rds of the Hiep Duc Ridge line, and we made it a point to shoot that place up daily.
The Hiep Duc tee'd into the Que Son Valley, and that was a place where young men grew up. I did OP's in there regularly, and you can put that place where the sun don't shine! Due south (just out of arty range by about two klicks) was Marry Anne. SF had teams in there constantly, and it was a horrible place. Marry Anne sat deep in a valley, so it would have been near impossible to hit the perimeter with 155's due to the angle of trajectory. M102's would have worked, but the higher up's left them home. Just near impossible to shoot high angle fire with the old 155's, and in Vietnam everything went by the arty umbrella. Yet no arty could reach A102 with the exception of the 175 guns on Ross (also a big no no)

Most folks don't know how MAC-V was built. There were units that stayed inside the country and of course SOG. Anybody in SF could cross the fence, and on occassion others did as well. I did a 29 day OP about fifty feet from the LAO border with a MAC-V Heavy Team in June of 68. That place just gave you the creeps looking at it, and the neighbors had no sense of humor. We lost the mountian top due to the lack of warm bodies. Those guys had a couple teams across the fence daily. You could write a book on their month long saga! Then there were the C-Team guys! This group is seriously interesting. That's where the term Mobile Strike Force comes from, and trust me they're evil! Marines used to have a bumper sticker touting about "if it has to be destroyed in 24 hours." Nobody was as nasty of a Mobile Strike Force. Think scorched earth policy! I heard Vinnie Poole say once that he could put together an 800 man strike force in two hours! I saw him do three hundred a couple times. By the way we lost Vinnie in late August or early September 68. I think it was the way he would have wanted it. By the way Vinnie's hero was Bennie Adkins. About as tough a man as have ever walked on this planet. He had a phrase he often used "What would Bennie do?"
gary



i take it you are referring to Lima site 85 that was over run in Laos, i'd love to hear more about your ops that you pulled, if you have the time.

trickymissfit
Joined: October 03, 2007
KitMaker: 1,375 posts
6th Scale: 0 posts
Posted: Saturday, September 19, 2020 - 05:03 PM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text


Quoted Text


Quoted Text

best thing I ever saw on SOG was a book titled SOG by John Plaster. I have not met John, but have met several of the men he interviewed for the book. One in mind was very candid and spoke as a matter of fact. Or make your hair turn white. That guy was part of Team Illinois. Most of his trips over the fence were in Laos, but he did two insertions in Cambodia (so he said). Told him once that SOG teams rolled thru my base camp about once every ten days, but never came back our way. He knew who they were and where they did their recon.
About once a year they'd all get together for a really good drunk at my VFW. Actually a pretty nice bunch of guys once you met them (about twenty men). The one thing that got my attention about them was their challange coin! Mine is about two inches in diameter, and Steve's had to be three and a half inches!
gary



yeah that one is on my hit list as well but i have 4 books about MACV-SOG on the "to read" pile.



make sure you read about the radio relay station on a mountain top in Laos. Will make the hair stand up on the back of your neck.

Our base camp was part of an experiment dreamed up by C Team folks in DaNang. The closest arty umbrella was ten miles north, and don't think the NVA hadn't figured this one out. Being where we were dumped, we controlled an eight mile radius. The SF guys always had two teams out 24/7, and we shot 80% of the time for them. Where we were gave us control of 2/3rds of the Hiep Duc Ridge line, and we made it a point to shoot that place up daily.
The Hiep Duc tee'd into the Que Son Valley, and that was a place where young men grew up. I did OP's in there regularly, and you can put that place where the sun don't shine! Due south (just out of arty range by about two klicks) was Marry Anne. SF had teams in there constantly, and it was a horrible place. Marry Anne sat deep in a valley, so it would have been near impossible to hit the perimeter with 155's due to the angle of trajectory. M102's would have worked, but the higher up's left them home. Just near impossible to shoot high angle fire with the old 155's, and in Vietnam everything went by the arty umbrella. Yet no arty could reach A102 with the exception of the 175 guns on Ross (also a big no no)

Most folks don't know how MAC-V was built. There were units that stayed inside the country and of course SOG. Anybody in SF could cross the fence, and on occassion others did as well. I did a 29 day OP about fifty feet from the LAO border with a MAC-V Heavy Team in June of 68. That place just gave you the creeps looking at it, and the neighbors had no sense of humor. We lost the mountian top due to the lack of warm bodies. Those guys had a couple teams across the fence daily. You could write a book on their month long saga! Then there were the C-Team guys! This group is seriously interesting. That's where the term Mobile Strike Force comes from, and trust me they're evil! Marines used to have a bumper sticker touting about "if it has to be destroyed in 24 hours." Nobody was as nasty of a Mobile Strike Force. Think scorched earth policy! I heard Vinnie Poole say once that he could put together an 800 man strike force in two hours! I saw him do three hundred a couple times. By the way we lost Vinnie in late August or early September 68. I think it was the way he would have wanted it. By the way Vinnie's hero was Bennie Adkins. About as tough a man as have ever walked on this planet. He had a phrase he often used "What would Bennie do?"
gary



i take it you are referring to Lima site 85 that was over run in Laos, i'd love to hear more about your ops that you pulled, if you have the time.




to the best of my knowledge, it wasn't over ran. Still maybe wrong. When I hit country, my orders were for a unit based at the Rockpile. I was trained and ready, although I knew zero about the Rockpile. They took the orders and threw them in a garbage can, and took another ten guys plus the five of us with the proper MOS. I soon learned your MOS number didn't mean squat!
I started out on Gator a little south of Chu Lai, and soon said I can do this with no trouble. That would be the second week of December 1967. Third week of January, I found myself on an LP about 250 yards outside the wire. This was all new to me, and really had no business out there. Then the Tet Offensive happened right in front of me. I wore out the squelch button, and felt like I was under ignor! Will never forgive them for that, but will not tell you why. That was where I got my first face to face meeting with Victor Charlie. I held my own, but lost a friend. I got thru Tet with out a scratch, but I'd never do it again. After Tet we did strikes to the south all the way to the War Zone Two border. Not really anything to brag about, and once again I won't go into detail. We came back to Gator to heal up and rebuild our equipment, and this should have been the tell tail sign. From there we went deep into Death Valley, and it became home. Still is home by the way! After a few months of getting beat up and whooping some folks we became popular (this is a bad thing). Everybody wanted us for OP's they had planned, and I was so nieve that I never knew what was going on. Did an OP with the 101st down south, and that was the start of things to come. I told you about the MAC-V heavy team out on the fence, that was the formal introduction to things to come. We loaded up and flew into A102, and that became the new home. About three hundred by four hundred yards long. After a week I figured out that were were the end of the line for tanks and everything else, but I had the 17th CAV for neighbors so all was good. Then one day they packed up an left. Then came B Troop 1st of the 1st CAV. problem was that they could go no further than a thousand yards out front of us. There was nothing between us and Laos, and their tracks were useless. You just learned to deal with it. Closest infantry was about nine miles due north, but about three times a year they'd do a sweep avoiding places like the Pine Apple Forest and all point to the south (they were not stupid). Tanks didn't like going thru the forest, but yours truly lead a ten man team thru there one afternoon without a shot being fired (certain they thought we were nuts).
Never been in the Ashau, but been two kicks south. Once again I never knew what was in there. Not very friendly folks up there, but we came out OK. Beside that Colonel in the 101st thought we could walk on water (God bless him). OP turned out to be a bust to our own good. I've been from one end of the Que Son Valley (we call it death valley) to the very west end. No happiness in there, I might add. The Hiep Duc Ridge is just as nasty as the Ashau, but much more concentrated. The biggest secondaries I ever saw were there (Christmas night 68). The real issue was that you actually became complacent to the mortar rounds and rockets. When you do that, it's your turn. We caught 8,000 mortar rounds over ten days during Tet 69.
My base camp had a chopper refueling point, and there was a bigger one over on Hawk Hill (over ran in 69). SF heavy teams, LRRPS, and SOG rolled thru there all the time. Always found their equipment most interesting! My favorite was the cut down RPD machine gun. Most people don't know it, but a Huey couldn't fly to Laos and make it back. An H34 could. A Phantom rolling out of Chu Lai (Marine pilots were the absolute best) had about thirty minutes over target at the west end of the valley. An A6 could stay there for quite awhile. Plus the A6 could drop snake in your hip pocket. Up on the north end of the Ashau that Phantom had about twenty minutes to get his business done.
I ran into a Fourth Infantry guy awhile ago at the VFW. He was returning from Kokomo, and wanted to know why I wasn't there. I told him bad juju! He knew exactly what I meant, but his wife still wanted to know. He told her to let it go. I don't do reunions much, but have done four or five in the past. Just not fun anymore for me anyway. I think I understand how a WWII or Korean war vet felt now in my old age. Still I could swallow a couple Iubpropen and tell you what I saw by the minute (I'm banned from taking that pain killer). I'm certain I'll have to explain my actions to my maker someday, and my only excuse was it was either him or me. My doctor sat me down and wanted to know about what I saw, and I left him in tears (his nurse as well). I simply told him I was getting off the dragon's tail one way or another. I pretty much did; thanks to the Lord!
gary
Klaus-Adler
Staff MemberCampaigns Administrator
MODELGEEK
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Scotland, United Kingdom
Joined: June 08, 2015
KitMaker: 1,497 posts
6th Scale: 0 posts
Posted: Monday, September 21, 2020 - 05:28 AM UTC
Gary,

you really need to write down your experiences while you were in Vietnam as you were covering
significant important areas that very few people did.

I have found the details and accounts that you have shared to absolutely fascinating and I appreciate the effort that it must have taken to commit some of them to an open forum like this.

many thanks.
trickymissfit
Joined: October 03, 2007
KitMaker: 1,375 posts
6th Scale: 0 posts
Posted: Monday, September 21, 2020 - 04:21 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Gary,

you really need to write down your experiences while you were in Vietnam as you were covering
significant important areas that very few people did.

I have found the details and accounts that you have shared to absolutely fascinating and I appreciate the effort that it must have taken to commit some of them to an open forum like this.

many thanks.



To be honest with you, all I need to do is to take two IBpropens, and hang on for a wild ride. Much of it, I don't even remember till those capsules go to work. Some of it seems strange and distant. I'll ask Randy or a couple others and they confirm it in further detail. When you get old it's like a festering sore, and won't go away. I wish it would!
About four or five years ago, I found the Lord. When I first started, my day was almost a continuois flash back. Sorta like a movie trailer that never ends. Some of it pretty funny, and some of it is heart breaking. Now days I don't see the hard core flash backs all that much, and I thank the Lord for getting between me and that crap.
I will die from Agent Orange (or whatever the flavor was that day). It's here and I have the scars, but I'm one of the one percent that shows no deep internal issues. I was hit with the stuff three times. First time during Tet in 68. They said it was bug killer (lets hope they were right). In August I was drenched with it, along with 22 other kids. In about a week or ten days we all were very ill, and nobody knew what was happening. A doctor out of DaNang (remember this) came out for a look see. Never seen anything like it. Say's he'll be back! Right! Nobody goes to Thien Phouc unless they're forced to. Sure enough the good man showed up with two other doctors and five or six nurses. Also the first American women we'd seen in months unless you got shot up. I fell in love! They tried several things on me with no luck, and actually used a medicine used for hogs. Knocked it down in about a week. The last thing the doctor said was we'll see each other again. Seven or eight years ago, it's knocking at my door. I knew exactly what it was when I went to see my doctor, but he was young enough to not know what he was looking at. He makes a phone call and has me drive strait to the VA after they saw photos. I go in there and a young red headed guy tells me it's a spider bite. Tell him he's wrong. He goes and gets this older guy (72 years to be exact). He looks at me and asked me about several scars and a depression on my ankle. I looked at him, and said you know that is. The guy was the doctor out of Danang. Takes my file and write Agent Orange in big red letters. He was able to knock it down again, his last words were well see you again. It came back in a really big a few years back, and the VA turned me over to Indiana University. Been clean for five years now, but don't think I don't examine my calves and ankles daily.

You know war isn't all blood and guts! Lots of it is funny as all get out. Things like great rat incident, or the NCO and above four holer outhouse. I could go on for days if not weeks with the funny stuff. I lost my squad twice, and will never forgive myself. Top said "don't mean nothin", but you always looked back to undo what went wrong. I carried "Digger 2" and it was mine. I got it when I found some big guy to take Digger One. I carried that 28 pound gun all thru Tet, and don't think I didn't try to unload it. (keep in mind I weighed 140lb.) Still I could shoot it like nobody's business. Specially off hand. No one was ever allowed to touch Digger 2 without my permission. I remember going into the Airforce Mess in Chu Lai after two bad days out on a hill top. The Mess Sargent would always welcome us with open arms, and feed us till we were ready to bust. The DRO picks up Digger, and I'm all over him with a 45 out of instinct. The Mess Sargent him to never ever touch another man's weapons. Felt bad about that. No matter how long the line was, it was like Moses parting the waves! That's how bad we stunk! First Sargent had some pretty derogatory names for them, but mostly called the REMF's. But the Mess Sargent was special with us. He asked once if I ever got an NVA pistol belt, and he'd love to have one. Top told that we'd try to hunt one up for him. We went back home and I grabbed a sand bag and put a dozen or so in it along with a couple pith helmets. Then I picked up a brand new SKS rifle, and said this will make his day. Week or so later we entered his mess hall and signed the book. Couple REMF's gave us a dirty look, and the mess sargent told them to get out of his mess hall. We ate for two hours, and for once he ate with us. Asked how he was gonna pay us back, and Top said keep feeding us! This is what I like to remember.

I was a walker, and traveled by instinct. If we were out and I got a funny buzz in my head, I'd get out and walk. Felt safer. After a couple incidents Top would walk with me (remember TOP was my real Dad and we were pretty close). I remember walking in front of three five tons and a couple ACAV's and rounding a bend in the Tam Key road (actually the "hook"). I see a dark spot fifty feet to my right deep in some bushes. I knew I was dead meat, and whispered behind me to get back as there was a bunker to my right. I got a fifty round belt on Digger, and while wetting my pants I sorta creep up to the bunker. It was a WWII Japanese steam roller! I was razed for quite awhile over that one, and Top asked the others how come they didn't see it? Looking back it really was funny!

I'll tell you about the great rat incident and the four holer from hell sometime. Nobody gets hurt.
gary
trickymissfit
Joined: October 03, 2007
KitMaker: 1,375 posts
6th Scale: 0 posts
Posted: Monday, September 21, 2020 - 04:35 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Gary,

you really need to write down your experiences while you were in Vietnam as you were covering
significant important areas that very few people did.

I have found the details and accounts that you have shared to absolutely fascinating and I appreciate the effort that it must have taken to commit some of them to an open forum like this.

many thanks.



Klaus,
your probably OK, I don't know you that well. Still somethings are better left buried, and some things I carried on my back for fifty two years too long. My doctor sat me down with a nurse (seriously pretty), and did a lot of inquiring. Next thing I know his nurse is in tears and he's right behind her. He kept asking me about the Que Son Valley and A102, and I ended it with the comment that was where you went to meet your maker. 19 year old kids grew up so fast they were old before they could vote. I see it in photos from back then and I don't even know who the kid is.
After three hard months you either get ate up or develop a survivor's instinct.
A guy asked Saturday afternoon why I didn't goto Kokomo this year. I told him it was bad juju! Nothing there for me other than going on a good hard drunk. His wife didn't understand, but he did, and he told her to let it go.
gary
RobinNilsson
Staff MemberDirector of Member Services
KITMAKER NETWORK
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: November 29, 2006
KitMaker: 6,635 posts
6th Scale: 1 posts
Posted: Monday, September 21, 2020 - 08:03 PM UTC
Gary,
Reading what you wrote had me in tears. Take care ....
Klaus-Adler
Staff MemberCampaigns Administrator
MODELGEEK
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Scotland, United Kingdom
Joined: June 08, 2015
KitMaker: 1,497 posts
6th Scale: 0 posts
Posted: Tuesday, September 22, 2020 - 04:09 AM UTC
Gary, i can understand a lot about the issues with prescription drugs as my wife has chronic back pain and was taking a whole cocktail of drugs: Gabapentin, Amitriptyline, Pregabalin, Naproxen, Sopadol (which i gave one tablet to a work colleague who was complaining of a sore back and it floored him and he was twice the size of my wife, a lesson there not to share your meds with anyone) and Co-codamol thirty five hundreds which goes by another name in the USA which i think is the one you mentioned.

She was so spaced out one day while we walked into asda/walmart that she thought we had done our grocery shopping and was walking straight back out again. that really freaked me out and we worked hard to get her off those damn pills.

as for carrying around baggage for to long, hear you on that one. i made the same mistake as well and i wasn't even in the military but i knew something was wrong with me and eventually i swallowed my stubborn male pride and went and got help. It certainly helped as i began to unload a lot of the stuff that happened to me when i was a kid. i was totally blown away when the therapist said i had PTSD, i'm like, no way. i can't have that, only guys who were in vietnam or some sort of war can have that, which was my response. needless to say that she set me straight on that one and told me because of all the past issues that i had re-wired my brain into full-time survival mode.
She said that in a crisis i was the one that she would want to be standing next to because as the brown stuff is hitting the fan i'm not running around panicking and crying we are all gonna die. she asked what happens when a crisis hits me and i told her, everything seems to slow down and i start to analyse everything for a solution to fix the problem.

but you are right that the good times are important things to remember and i look forward to hearing about the great rat race. i am also very happy that you have your faith and god to help you through the dark times as we all need someone to help us even if some times we are to stubborn to realise it, which was true in my case.

I don't know you well and you don't know me but our love of modelling has given us a connection and although i am across the pond, if you ever need to talk to someone hit me up mate, ok.
trickymissfit
Joined: October 03, 2007
KitMaker: 1,375 posts
6th Scale: 0 posts
Posted: Tuesday, September 22, 2020 - 03:42 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Gary, i can understand a lot about the issues with prescription drugs as my wife has chronic back pain and was taking a whole cocktail of drugs: Gabapentin, Amitriptyline, Pregabalin, Naproxen, Sopadol (which i gave one tablet to a work colleague who was complaining of a sore back and it floored him and he was twice the size of my wife, a lesson there not to share your meds with anyone) and Co-codamol thirty five hundreds which goes by another name in the USA which i think is the one you mentioned.

She was so spaced out one day while we walked into asda/walmart that she thought we had done our grocery shopping and was walking straight back out again. that really freaked me out and we worked hard to get her off those damn pills.

as for carrying around baggage for to long, hear you on that one. i made the same mistake as well and i wasn't even in the military but i knew something was wrong with me and eventually i swallowed my stubborn male pride and went and got help. It certainly helped as i began to unload a lot of the stuff that happened to me when i was a kid. i was totally blown away when the therapist said i had PTSD, i'm like, no way. i can't have that, only guys who were in vietnam or some sort of war can have that, which was my response. needless to say that she set me straight on that one and told me because of all the past issues that i had re-wired my brain into full-time survival mode.
She said that in a crisis i was the one that she would want to be standing next to because as the brown stuff is hitting the fan i'm not running around panicking and crying we are all gonna die. she asked what happens when a crisis hits me and i told her, everything seems to slow down and i start to analyse everything for a solution to fix the problem.

but you are right that the good times are important things to remember and i look forward to hearing about the great rat race. i am also very happy that you have your faith and god to help you through the dark times as we all need someone to help us even if some times we are to stubborn to realise it, which was true in my case.

I don't know you well and you don't know me but our love of modelling has given us a connection and although i am across the pond, if you ever need to talk to someone hit me up mate, ok.



Let me tell you something that that is kinda odd, absolute truth.

I've been married twice, and truthfully love both exes as long we don't cross the DMZ. Number one and I almost remarried, but twenty minutes into the hook I was running for my life. Still I don't hate her, but we nothing like we were. Walk thru the gates of hell with here. but nothing more. Her brother is a guy named Larry, and his history in the military is big time. Larry came into country in March or April of 68. He pretty much missed Tet, and like to think an act of God. Still Larry served his apprenticeship in the Rubber plantation down. Mostly in the LZ Thunder thru Thunder 3 area. No pussies in there! The Quarter CAV went home with the Big Red One, and of course Larry packed his bags to go home. A Sargent Major took him out in the middle of Highway One, and "boy your going 350 miles"! Larry was found to be an extremely good tracker, and seemed to be able to smell a mine. While with the Quarter CAV, Larry earned the Bronze Star with the V and oak leaf clusters. I never knew Larry when he was with B Troop, but certain I've seen him and heard him on the fire push. Towards the end of the year, the Army attached a team of Green Berets. The LT. in that group was a guy named Bud. I know him well, but nothing of him in RVN. Larry and Bud have never been in contact which is strange. So where does Bud come into the equation? Well I've had this same girl friend for 13 years. I love her to death, and often tell her. One day Bud is in town, and I go down the street to welcome him home. I instantly recognize his voice. Bud asked me where my base camp was and I told. You could have almost heard a pin drop. He said they tried every day to break into our base camp and finally got it done in late June or early July. Said he rode in ontop B32 and never saw so many bodies laying (2000 estimated). Well B32 was Larry's recon track! But it gets even better. I have a good friend who also was in B Troop 1st of the 1st CAV. He went home in August, and his track was B32!!
Bud told Gloria about the Que Son Valley and Thien Phouc. I wish he hadn't! It took the majority of five months and five or six infantry battalions to get there. I was the last man out and no matter when you ETS'd your stuck there to at least June. Randy did an extra four months alone! No way out!
Well the slick I rode out on left at exactly seven in the morning. I was still drunk from a short timer's party. The NVA were within fifty feet of me, and chose to ignor me. We leave and the door gunner starts shooting the door guns in a panic. Asked what was happening, and he said the whole place was under attack. I get back and there are about forty infantry guys armed to the teeth on the pad. I finally was drug off the chopper kicking and screaming. The chopper goes down later in the day. Everybody is certain I'm on it. The even had a wake for me. While this is going on, they launch a seven man green beret team to retrieve the bodies. They didn't ever find me, and searched for five weeks. That team leader lives near me and I met him once. He said your the one! Said he ended up with a broken leg.

Back to Bud. He's dying right now. Agent Orange claims another one. I'll never forgive the U.S. Government over this, plus you got Monsanto carrying the blame as well. Monsanto did what the NVA only dreamed of doing
gary