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RailRoad Modeling
For general topics on RailRoad modeling.
Model Railroad Scales
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
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Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,416 posts
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Posted: Sunday, April 29, 2007 - 09:36 AM UTC
For non-modelers: Model Railroad scales

A good site by a modeler showing the scale name, e.g., "O scale", with ratio (1/48), by millimeters and inches, etc. : http://www.spikesys.com/Modelrr/scales.html


One other thing. Anyone interested in melding figure and gaming models into model railroads will find this scale reference interesting:

http://theminiaturespage.com/ref/scales.html

1/144 is 12mm
1/100 is 15mm
1/87 is 18.5mm
1/76 is 21.2nm
1/72 is 22.4mm
1/64 is 25mm
1/48 is 33.5mm
1/32 (model railroad No. 1 or I scale) is 50.3mm
1/30 is 54mm
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,416 posts
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Posted: Tuesday, August 20, 2013 - 06:07 AM UTC
I found this table for converting inches to fractions to decimal to metric -- excellent for choosing drill bits.

http://www.hamuniverse.com/antfrac.html
KoSprueOne
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Myanmar
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Posted: Tuesday, August 20, 2013 - 12:17 PM UTC
Thanks, very useful information





highway70
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California, United States
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Posted: Sunday, September 01, 2013 - 11:15 AM UTC
I noticed a couple errors on the Model Railroad Scales list:

1) Not listed - HOn30 (also called HOn2-1/2), HO Scale (1:87) trains on N gauge track. - probably could be included under HOf listing. I have never seen a reference to HOf before so it is not common in the USA. In the US it is used to represent both the rare 30 inch prototypes and (although the gauge is wrong) often 3 ft gauge prototypes. It's origins are for reasons similar to On30, although unlike On30 it does not have major manufacture support.

2) Nn3 is N scale (1:160) models on Z gauge track representing 3 ft gauge prototypes. The gauge is slightly wide but so close to correct that even very exacting Nn3 modelers usually use it even when hand laying track.

JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,416 posts
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Posted: Sunday, September 01, 2013 - 03:47 PM UTC
Highway70,

Good catch.

Man, handlaying Nn3!? Wow!

Hey, what kit is your McCormick T20?
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,416 posts
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Posted: Tuesday, September 03, 2013 - 02:55 PM UTC
I found this post from 2005. It fits with this thread.

A stroll down modeling-memory lane can be fun. Look at these scales c.1950-70s (by then 'standard' scales were recognized). I have the companies I know of in parenthesis: 1/20, 1/21 (Tamiya), 1/24, 1/25, 1/30 (Nichimo, Bandai), 1/32, 1/35, 1/36, 1/40 (Revell), 1/43.5 (English model railroad O scale), 1/48 (model railroad O scale in USA), 1/50 (Tamiya, UPC aircraft), 1/64 (railroad S scale, Lindberg & some Monogram aircraft), 1/72, 1/76 (railroad OO), 1/87 (railroad HO, MiniTanks), 1/96 (ships), 1/100 (Tamiya / AHM / UPC, etc aircraft)...

...then there are the Box Scales--manufacturer's literally scaled models to fit in 'standard sized' boxes.

You will see patterns: 1/100--1/50--1/25, 1/32--1/48--1/72--1/96. AFAIK, the 1/32--1/48--1/72--1/96 scales are based on Western 1/16th of an inch multiples, while 1/100--1/50--1/25, and 1/700 naval came from metric Asia.

Then there are the milimeter scales of figures and model railroads! Model RR's G scale ("Garden scale") is not only a scale, but also actually a family of scales! These are models that can be run outdoors. The reason that it is a family has to do with that all are designed to run on a common track with a single track gauge, 1.77 inches (Gauge is the distance between the rails) . As the size of the model increases, the track gauge gets smaller relative to the model's scale. These scales:

#1 = 1/32
A = 1/29
H = 1/24
G = 1/22.5
F = 1/20.3
M = 1/13.7

Model RR scales that are exactly mixable with military models are:

H: 1/24, 1/25
A: 1/29 - for Revell's old 1/28 WWI airplanes, old Nichimo armor
No.1: 1/32
O: 1/48
S: 1/64
OO: 1/76
HO: 1/87
TT: 1/100 (US & UK), 1/120 (Germany)
North4003
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Kentucky, United States
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Posted: Wednesday, October 15, 2014 - 12:57 PM UTC
Fred, thank you for posting this information, very useful.